About us

  • The ISPS Executive Committee (ISPS EC) is composed of eight members who are elected by ballot, by the ISPS membership, every three years. The current chairperson is Jan Olav Johannessen. The ISPS EC is made up of people with a wide range of interests and experience, all of whom donate their time voluntarily, and all of whom are highly committed to the common aim of advancing education, training and knowledge of mental health professionals in the treatment and prevention of psychotic mental disorders for the public benefit.

Single page

Single page (30)

Friday, 15 September 2017 15:46

ISPS Liverpool Declaration

Written by

Making Real Change Happen

This conference is driven by our belief that fundamental changes are needed if people who experience psychosis are to have their psychological and social care needs met adequately. The following statement, our ‘Liverpool Declaration’ sets out our beliefs about the kind of changes that are needed. Individuals and organisations who would like to express their support, please pledge support here.

View the list of supporters

ISPS Liverpool Declaration

We share a number of core principles and positions:

The nature of psychosis: We believe that the current paradigm in understanding the causes and nature of psychosis focuses too much on biological perspectives and not enough on social and psychological perspectives. Social and psychological experiences continue to be viewed as simply ‘triggering’ underlying disease processes, a perspective no longer supported by research. We believe that the time has come to reverse the balance – which we believe will lead to a fuller and more accurate understanding of these conditions. A more accurate understanding of the causes and nature of Psychosis will be found by emphasizing psychological and social perspectives, while not ignoring biological perspectives

The treatment of psychosis:  We believe that the preferred treatment of psychosis should be social and psychological interventions, with biological interventions (including medications) used sparingly,. There is now strong evidence for the efficacy of non-medical interventions, which should always be a part of every treatment plan for a person diagnosed with a psychotic disorder

Prevention of psychosis: We believe that the most efficient and cost-effective means of reducing or preventing psychosis would be to develop programs to help families and societies raise their young children, to minimize the adverse experiences that are now clearly related to the development of psychosis.

The role of the person diagnosed: We believe that individuals diagnosed with psychotic disorders (or any other mental disorder) are no less a person and no less deserving of respect than those not given a diagnosis. They, and their family (if supportive), must be as involved as much as possible in decisions about their treatment. Collaboration should be the hallmark of any approach, and persons should be offered as much choice as possible about how best to deal with the problems they are experiencing.

Political and social action: On the basis of these positions, we commit to advocate for more social and psychological approaches to the psychoses, and to increasing the public and professional understanding of psychosis as being largely a response to life experiences. We commit to advocate to government agencies for this to happen, to support research consistent with this perspective, and to use media and respond to media stories when appropriate. We support the increasing expectation of at least parity with physical health in the provision of resources for mental health disorders and for research.  Resources for psychosocial interventions should be proportionate to the evidence base for their effectiveness.

We hope that the implementation of these principles could lead to a paradigm shift in the treatment and understanding of those among us who experience psychotic symptoms or who are diagnosed with psychotic disorders.

ISPS, July 2017.

Thursday, 28 July 2016 09:04

ISPS Charter of Good Practice

Written by
Monday, 09 November 2015 12:24

Self-help for people with lived experience

Written by
Monday, 09 November 2015 12:21

Specific Methods of therapy

Written by
Monday, 09 November 2015 12:19

Therapies and social approaches, general

Written by
Monday, 09 November 2015 11:34

Learning Resources

Written by

The editors offer these pages as a resource for anyone with an interest in psychological and social approaches to recovery from psychosis. Here you will find information on evidence based approaches, as well as on alternate therapies not yet backed up by the weight of randomly controlled trials. Wherever possible we have also included evidence showing that an approach is ineffective, contraindicated, or even harmful. We hope these pages will be a supportive resource for both experienced and inexperienced clinicians, for people with lived experience and their families.

These pages will be updated as new information becomes available. If you are an expert in a related field, the editors welcome your suggestions..

Editor Learning Resources, Margreet de Pater  -  margreet.depater@ziggo.nl
Editor Psychodynamic Pages, Brian Martindale - bm@bmakm.plus.com
Editor Neurobiology Pages, Brian Koehler - bk64@nyu.edu

Start exploring now! Click on the links below:

P.S. when the link is black, click the red one above

Monday, 14 January 2013 09:25

Models of Madness translations

Written by
Monday, 12 November 2012 11:11

Survivors of psychosis

Written by

survivors

ISPS and its membership officially welcomed the involvement of survivors with the election of the first service user / survivor onto the Executive Committee (EC) in 2012. Two of the eight members of the current EC are survivors and ISPS is continually working towards expanding the participation of survivors in the work of the society. The International Conference of ISPS in New York in 2015 included presentations and workshops led by survivors and a very popular survivor/nurse joint presentation from colleagues in Norway. The 20th International Conference of the ISPS aims to expand the involvement of service users, survivors and nurses in the ISPS further information

Further information for survivors and about recovery from psychosis can be found on our Learning Tools pages.

Monday, 12 November 2012 10:10

Families and Carers

Written by

family members ISPS

Family members and carers involvement in ISPS

ISPS welcomes and encourages the involvement of family members and carers in the society and is looking to expand their participation. The International Conference of ISPS in New York (March 2015) attracted a greater number of family members than previous conferences and several presentations and workshops included family members. ISPS maintains an e-mail discussion group for ISPS members who are carers / have a family member who has experienced psychosis. The members of the group offer each other support, discuss and debate issues relevant to their experiences, and liaise with the ISPS Executive Committee. If you are interested in joining the email group please contact isps@isps.org 

Further information for families of persons with psychosis can be found on our Learning Tools pages.

Page 1 of 3

facebook-join twitter-icon

 

read-about2

read-about-journal

order-online2

ISPS Journal

RPSY

The ISPS Journal Psychosis accepts personal and institutional subscriptions. All Individual Members of ISPS and members of regional ISPS groups receive quarterly issues of the journal as a membership benefit.

The ISPS Journal has recently been accepted by Web of Science

ISPS Book Series

NEW! Art Therapy for P...

Art Therapy for Psychosis presents innovative theoretical and clinical approaches to psychosis that have developed in the work of expert clinicians...